PLANET GRANITE BLOG

by: James Nurse

 

Lead climbing is what I love most about this sport. While climbing can primarily be described as an individual sport, there is almost nothing more important to a lead climber’s success than trusting their belayer. This trust allows the climber to focus 100% on their climb and to commit to those harder and scarier moves. On the flip side, the fastest way to erase that trust is to give your climber a hard catch or, even worse, spike them.

There are many tips, tricks and techniques that climbers learn and develop over the years to make themselves the best belayer possible in all scenarios.

Here are three tips to giving your climbing partner a soft catch.

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by: Riley Meyer

 

The climbing approach, the trail or walk in to the base of an outdoor rock climb, can be a weird concept for newer climbers who have learned in a gym setting. I’ve heard from some that it can be intimidating climbing outside the gym because there is so much more you need to know and it can take some time before you can get there. But approaching the crag is one of my favorite parts of any excursion.

Growing up I spent a lot of time outdoors and hiking with the Boy Scouts. There were so many different hikes and trips throughout Big Basin, Yosemite and a lot of Tuolumne. I saw the trail as my challenge and I took my time to enjoy what each trail had to offer–it was my prize.

Often we had a destination or peak we hiked to and we considered that a bonus, but it was the whole experience that I reveled in. The fresh air, wildlife, smell of the trees, all of it culminated into this great adventure every time.

As soon as I began climbing, something changed. My goal became the topout, the send, the flash, whatever you prefer to call it, but my mindset shifted.

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by: Ashley Van Dyne – Sunnyvale Yoga Manager

 

You make it to a yoga class. You’re laying down at the end and you’re ready to relax in Savasana, the last resting pose.  As you settle in, the teacher tells you in their softest and most reassuring voice to let go, to surrender.

And you do.  For about 3 seconds.  Then the stream of thoughts begins:

…What am I supposed to be doing here?

…Do they have to drop those weights outside?

…How am I supposed to relax when that is happening?

…What should I have for dinner?

…Oh wait, I’m supposed to quieting my mind! Ok, peaceful mind, relax…and you do–for about 3 seconds before the parade of thoughts begins again.

Sound familiar? If so, you are not alone.

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Bouldering

By: Jon Meltzer

BOULDERER IS A WORD

It’s true, rock climbing requires some technical knowledge. We need to know how to tie a variety of knots, as well as ways to manage slack and get down from the summit safely. We need to have gear (many of us tend to go overboard with racks upon racks of carabiners, slings, cams and other various baubles). We need marathon endurance to tackle gigantic, wandering routes that disappear into the clouds. Right?

… Well, not exactly. There are several other ways to climb. One type is distilled down to all but the most rudimentary parts – (wo)man versus rock. We remove the need for gear and ropes, and forgo long, wandering routes that take hours, even days, to complete. We climb shorter things – called “problems” as opposed to “routes” –  usually under 15 feet and without ropes.  These problems can require more nuanced, precise and oftentimes, powerful movements. We call this bouldering, and it’s a sport, activity and lifestyle all its own.
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Plan Your Climbing Trip

By: Ty Baxter

‘Tis the season! Whether your heart is set on Red River Gorge, Indian Creek or Red Rocks, it’s officially climbing season somewhere. You’ve watched the weather, acquired all the gear and downloaded the crags on your app…now what?

Make sure your t’s are crossed and i’s are dotted by checking out these quick tips for planning your climbing trip.Read More…

Van Life

By: Kim Tellez

When I’m in Rifle, all I want to do is climb. From the moment I wake up, I’m ready to take off and jump on the warm-up routes. I sleep with the guide book next to my pillow. On a sheet of scratch paper sticking out of the book is the list of routes I carefully chose the night before. I’m still a bit impatient, like a kid at Disneyland, but I’m working on it.  As the sun creeps over my van, I get out and walk around and pace around my climbing partner’s car, who is usually still fast asleep. I might even bump into his car a few times to get the ball rolling.

Sometimes though, it’s still pretty cold outside, which means the rock is also probably still cold and not quite ready to climb. So how should I best use this time to prepare for the ensuing Rifle training day? I know that once we start climbing and exchanging belays, there won’t be time to eat a whole meal.Read More…